Recent Stories

No-Till Farmers’ Push for Healthy Soils Ignites a Movement in the Plains

As the world begins to zero in on the need to bring this soil back to life, farmers practicing no-till in the middle of the country could play a key role. As they reshape their operations with a focus on things like earthworms and water filtration, and practice a suite of other approaches that fit loosely under the umbrella of “regenerative agriculture,” these farmers are stepping out of the ag mainstream.

You Can Change Your Soil

After 25 years of experimenting with cover crop mixes and tillage practices, Gabe Brown has a simple message for those who would like to put their farms or ranches on a more sustainable path. “You have the ability to change your soils and your operation,” he told a crowd of more than 300 Thursday at a soil health workshop in Burley. “You can do it.”

One Grain at a Time: Assam’s Rice Seed Library for Climate Resilience

Annapurna Library in Assam is one with a difference. Instead of books it stores seeds of traditional rice varieties. These traditional varieties have traits that can protect the farmers and people of Assam from the impact of climate change on food security. Assam has high vulnerability to climate change, so these seeds are of high significance.

Man Who Wrote the Book on Regenerative Agriculture Says Conservation is the Fifth Ag Revolution

According to Dr. David Montgomery, author and professor at the University of Washington who spoke to farmers during the 22nd Annual No-Till on the Plains Winter Conference, our soils around the world have been severely degraded due to conventional agricultural practices. In a recent interview with Radio Oklahoma Ag Network Associate Farm Director Carson Horn, Montgomery says soil degradation has taken on two forms in modern times.