Brent Preston is Farming Sustainably for the Next Generation

While attempting to make a living organically, Brent Preston and family found the inevitable years of mistakes, false starts, financial hardship, emotional and physical exhaustion, scorn from local conventional farmers, perseverance and—at very long last—success. All are documented with candor and humor in Preston’s book, “The New Farm: Our Ten Years on the Front Lines of the Good Food Revolution”, released in the U.S. earlier this year.

Carbon Farming Works. Can It Scale up in Time to Make a Difference?

Wool, an often-overlooked agricultural commodity, has also opened a number of unexpected doors for Bare Ranch. In fact, their small yarn and wool business has allowed Lani and John Estill to begin “carbon farming,” or considering how and where their land can pull more carbon from the atmosphere and put it into the soil in an effort to mitigate climate change. And in a rural part of the state where talk of climate change can cause many a raised eyebrow, such a shift is pretty remarkable.

PastureMap Brings a High-Tech Approach to Sustainable Grazing

Beef producers face criticism for their product’s impact on the environment—from land degradation to high greenhouse gas emissions caused by manure storage, feed production, and even the way cattle digest food. Through her startup PastureMap, entrepreneur Christine Su hopes to improve those practices while helping ranchers increase their bottom line.

This Revolution Will Be Farmed

Nathan Kleinman is co-founder of the Experimental Farm Network (EFN), an open-source seed company, with about 80 hardy varietals currently for sale on its website. More broadly, it’s a sustainable farming community with a mission to identify and breed carbon-sequestering perennials, relying for labor on a volunteer army of experienced and newbie agriculturists across the country.

What Does the New Regenerative Organic Certification Mean for the Future of Good Food?

Organic is not enough. Or that’s the thinking behind the new Regenerative Organic Certification (ROC) that was officially launched at the Natural Products Expo West trade show last week. The Regenerative Organic Alliance, a coalition of organizations and businesses led by the Rodale Institute, Patagonia, and Dr. Bronner’s, have joined the seemingly unstoppable engine propelling sustainable agriculture beyond the term “organic,” or, as some believe, bringing it back to its original meaning.

No-Till Farmers’ Push for Healthy Soils Ignites a Movement in the Plains

As the world begins to zero in on the need to bring this soil back to life, farmers practicing no-till in the middle of the country could play a key role. As they reshape their operations with a focus on things like earthworms and water filtration, and practice a suite of other approaches that fit loosely under the umbrella of “regenerative agriculture,” these farmers are stepping out of the ag mainstream.

Turning Appalachia’s Mountaintop Coal Mines Into Farms

Refresh Appalachia is a social enterprise that partners with Reclaim Appalachia to convert post-mine lands into productive and profitable agriculture and forestry enterprises that could be scaled up to put significant numbers of people in layoff-riddled Appalachia back to work. When Refresh Appalachia launched in 2015, West Virginia had the lowest workforce participation rate in the nation.

Fire Ecology’s Lessons for a More Resilient Future

There is no silver lining to a fire like those that struck Sonoma and Napa counties in October, or the still-burning Thomas Fire in Southern California. But for people like Willie and Erik Ohlsen, the North Bay fires are a wake-up call, a chance to proactively address the way the plants and animals of Northern California have co-evolved with fire—and to rebuild these communities with fire in mind.