Brazilian Food Forests Take Root in Australia, Helping Growers Save Water and Control Pests

Move over biodynamic and organic farming — there is a new farming technique on the block, in which fruit and vegetable crops are grown in conjunction with trees. Known as syntropic farming, it is a regenerative agricultural cropping method developed in Brazil that aims to mimic the way forest plants work symbiotically to grow in abundance.

Restoring Degraded Landscapes in Niger with Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration

Farmer-managed natural regeneration (FMNR) is the encouragement of regeneration and then the management of trees and shrubs that sprout from tree stumps, roots and seeds found in degraded soils, such as those currently in agricultural production. Trees and crops grown in combination like this is called agroforestry and provides multiple benefits to farmers, crops, climate, and wildlife.

Agroforestry: A Lifeline for This Kenyan Indigenous Community

The Cherangani people of Kenya were for generations reliant on the forest for hunting, gathering and agroforestry—a way of life that was curtailed by the colonial government. Today, Cherangani communities living on the edge of the forest have returned to their traditions, intercropping avocado, bean and coffee plants among trees that help reduce water runoff and soil erosion, and improve nutrient cycling.

Cooperative Agroforestry Empowers Indigenous Women in Honduras

The Lenca indigenous group in a dry region of Honduras has practiced agroforestry for millennia. Recently a group of women formed a cooperative to market their coffee grown in the shade of these trees as organic and fair trade, and they have enjoyed a sizable price increase. The Lencas’ agroforestry system also provides fruit and timber products that are ready for sale or trade during times of the year when the coffee crop is not ripe.