One Grain at a Time: Assam’s Rice Seed Library for Climate Resilience

Annapurna Library in Assam is one with a difference. Instead of books it stores seeds of traditional rice varieties. These traditional varieties have traits that can protect the farmers and people of Assam from the impact of climate change on food security. Assam has high vulnerability to climate change, so these seeds are of high significance.

In Ethiopia’s Wheat Diversity, the Seeds of a Wheat Rust Solution

Today, in order to combat Ug99 and other pathogens, Ethiopian breeders take advantage of diverse genes. The old varieties are an important source for new genes, because genes can’t be produced from scratch. In a constantly changing world, where pathogens adapt and other environmental conditions keep changing, a diverse gene pool for breeders to draw from is often the best insurance for the future.

Biodiversity for Resilience Against Natural Disasters

Climate change is increasingly putting pressure on farmers and the global food systems. Groups are highlighting the importance of resilience—an ecosystem’s capacity to resist or recover from stress, shocks, and disturbances—for the security and productivity of the world’s food and farming systems in the face of climate change.

Pledge for Poison Free Food and Farming

We are creating a network of poison free organic zones that rejuvenate biodiversity, the soil and water, that create climate resilience and climate stability, that protect the health and well being of our children and the heirs of all species. Through poison free food and farming, we sow the seeds for a brighter future and the future of all beings on our living, vibrant and generous Earth.

Why Fungi Rule the World

Mycorrhizal fungi also have an outsize role in the decomposition of dead plants and the release of carbon. And since Earth’s soil contains more than three times as much carbon as its atmosphere, what fungi do in the soil could dramatically affect climate change. One conclusion: humans have underestimated the humble fungi. Not Talbot. As she puts it, “Mycorrhizal fungi are running the world.”

Teaching Agroecology in the Himalayan Foothills

Navandya encourages a mix of ancestral and modern farming techniques through the practice of agroecology. The teaching is based on simple science and economics—farmers don’t need to bury themselves in debt to tend their crops. Healthy soils and climate-adapted, local seeds can generate adequate yields and well-fed children. Navdanya’s method isn’t anti-modern, but it is based on ancestral wisdom.