This ‘Carbon Removal Marketplace’ Will Make Buying Offsets Easier

A new “carbon removal marketplace” hopes to make it easier for consumers and businesses to directly support farmers who want to shift to climate-friendly practices. It will also later connect consumers to other types of carbon offsets, such as those from tree-planting projects. Called Nori, the new platform, which will launch by the end of the year, will use blockchain to streamline the process of buying and selling offsets.

Carbon Farmers Work to Clean Up the World’s Mess

Carbon farming is based on the principle that plants take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere during photosynthesis. While much of that carbon stays in the plants themselves, some of it also travels into the soil. And when plants die, more carbon is added to the ground as organic material. The idea is that some agricultural practices—like planting cover crops instead of leaving soil exposed, using compost instead of synthetic chemicals, and planting a diversity of crops instead of a monoculture—can help to keep more carbon out of the atmosphere than their alternatives.

Carbon Farming Works. Can It Scale up in Time to Make a Difference?

Wool, an often-overlooked agricultural commodity, has also opened a number of unexpected doors for Bare Ranch. In fact, their small yarn and wool business has allowed Lani and John Estill to begin “carbon farming,” or considering how and where their land can pull more carbon from the atmosphere and put it into the soil in an effort to mitigate climate change. And in a rural part of the state where talk of climate change can cause many a raised eyebrow, such a shift is pretty remarkable.

Carbon Farming Coming to Santa Barbara

Carbon ranching is coming to Santa Barbara, but farmers aren’t growing carbon — they’re putting it back into the ground. With the help of compost and cattle, native grasses can sequester organic carbon, enriching the soil and removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

With New Carbon Farming Project, Boulder County Could Become Massive Greenhouse Gas Sponge

Interest in carbon farming is blossoming throughout the U.S. and many local farmers, land owners and land managers are already using carbon farming techniques. Boulder County and the City commissioned the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL) of Colorado State University to conduct a feasibility study. They wanted to assess the potential for a large-scale carbon farming project in Boulder, similar to the Marin Carbon Project.