Cooperative Agroforestry Empowers Indigenous Women in Honduras

The Lenca indigenous group in a dry region of Honduras has practiced agroforestry for millennia. Recently a group of women formed a cooperative to market their coffee grown in the shade of these trees as organic and fair trade, and they have enjoyed a sizable price increase. The Lencas’ agroforestry system also provides fruit and timber products that are ready for sale or trade during times of the year when the coffee crop is not ripe.

Josefa Breathes a Sigh of Relief

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) says giving women the same access as men to agricultural resources could increase production on women’s farms in less developed countries by 20 to 30 percent. This could raise total agricultural production in underdeveloped countries by 2.5 to 4 percent and alleviate the hunger of 100 to 150 million people. One-third of our participant families are headed by females.

Pawnee Corn Coming Back Strong

For the second time in 143 years, Pawnee people are returning to the land of their ancestors where today their native corn has come back to life in a new way. Pawnee corn has been growing and is now again thriving in the Nebraska after 15 years of work by both past and present Nebraskans.

How to Feed Ourselves in a Time of Climate Crisis

Changing the food system is the most important thing humans can do to fix our broken carbon cycles. Meanwhile, food security is all about adaptation when you’re dealing with crazy weather and shifting growing zones. How can a world of 7 billion—and growing—feed itself? Here are 13 of the best ideas for a just and sustainable food system.

Local Food Video Series: Diverse Approaches to Common Challenges

In the summer of 2017, I set out on a road trip filming a documentary series on North American local food initiatives. During this journey, I had the privilege of meeting dozens of farmers who shared an inspiring and diverse vision for the future of North American food. Beginning in November 2017, each of their stories will be presented as a component of a 10-part series entitled The Food Less Traveled.

Eating From Trees

There was a time when lots of our vegetables came from trees in our backyard or that of the neighbours. May be it is time we revisited those days. Imagine if we got our veggies from trees just like we do our fruits.

Start Small – The Story of Bec Hellouin Permaculture Farm

Charles and Perrine Hervé-Gruyer decided to become low impact farmers in 2006. Their efforts to grow food without mechanisation or chemicals were often ridiculed in the early years. But their farm in Normandy, Bec Hellouin, is now established as the premier permaculture farm in France. It is also the source of a number of scientific studies showing that it’s possible to make a living wage by growing food using permaculture techniques on just a quarter of an acre of land.

The Grain That Tastes Like Wheat, but Grows Like a Prairie Grass

Kernza is sometimes called a “perennial wheat.” But it’s a separate species. Chestnut-colored, skinnier, and more irregular in size than wheat berries, Kernza yields a little under a third as much in the field as conventional wheat. But it has one major advantage over the grain that helped launch human civilization: a long life span.