No-Till Farmers’ Push for Healthy Soils Ignites a Movement in the Plains

As the world begins to zero in on the need to bring this soil back to life, farmers practicing no-till in the middle of the country could play a key role. As they reshape their operations with a focus on things like earthworms and water filtration, and practice a suite of other approaches that fit loosely under the umbrella of “regenerative agriculture,” these farmers are stepping out of the ag mainstream.

You Can Change Your Soil

After 25 years of experimenting with cover crop mixes and tillage practices, Gabe Brown has a simple message for those who would like to put their farms or ranches on a more sustainable path. “You have the ability to change your soils and your operation,” he told a crowd of more than 300 Thursday at a soil health workshop in Burley. “You can do it.”

Man Who Wrote the Book on Regenerative Agriculture Says Conservation is the Fifth Ag Revolution

According to Dr. David Montgomery, author and professor at the University of Washington who spoke to farmers during the 22nd Annual No-Till on the Plains Winter Conference, our soils around the world have been severely degraded due to conventional agricultural practices. In a recent interview with Radio Oklahoma Ag Network Associate Farm Director Carson Horn, Montgomery says soil degradation has taken on two forms in modern times.

No-till at Woven Roots Farm: An Interview With Co-owner Jen Salinetti

Jen Salinetti is a no-till vegetable farmer in Massachusetts. Jen feels by not disturbing the soil on their farm with tillage, they have a considerable positive impact on carbon sequestration on their land. They have also experienced a significant increase in quality and yields which has enabled them to create a viable business on a small amount of land.

How a Climate-friendly Flour Company Built a Flourishing Market

Shepherd’s Grain producers are “in it for the long-term,” Fleming says. By stewarding their land in a way that will keep it robust into the future, they are helping answer the all-important question, as Fleming puts it: “How are we going to have healthy food to feed our nation?”