The Crop of the Future

Whether you call it global warming or climate change, the emotionally charged topic generally associated with greenhouse gases brings an array of reactions – from genuine concern to belief in a conspiracy. Earth’s average surface temperature has increased 1.3ºF. over the past century and is projected to increase by an additional 3.2ºF. to 7.2ºF. over the 21st century. It is happening at a faster rate than ever before.

Peter Byck – ‘The Power of Being Heard’

In our first episode of Designers of Paradise host Erik van Lennep talks with filmmaker and storyteller Peter Byck. Peter is associated with both the Schools of Sustainability and Journalism at Arizona State University. He released Carbon Nation in 2010 and has since produced a series of short documentaries exploring the impact of adaptive multi-paddock grazing on farms and ranches called Soil Carbon Cowboys.

Impacts of Soil Carbon Sequestration on Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Midwestern USA Beef Finishing Systems

On-farm beef production and emissions data are combined with 4-year soil C analysis. Feedlot production produces lower emissions than adaptive multi-paddock grazing. Adaptive multi-paddock grazing can sequester large amounts of soil C. Emissions from the grazing system were offset completely by soil C sequestration. Soil C sequestration from well-managed grazing may help to mitigate climate change.

Could Soils Help Save the Climate?

Soils are a double-edged climate sword. They are huge reservoirs of organic carbon and can act as a carbon sink. But they can also release CO2 into the atmosphere when used unsustainably.

A New Weapon in the Carbon Fight

There has been a renewed interest in understanding how soils can serve as a sink for carbon dioxide since atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have crossed 410 parts per million and oceans are already turning acidic. Besides, increasing soil carbon offers a range of co-benefits and this would buy us time before other technologies can help us transition to a zero-carbon lifestyle.

Master Gardeners: Making a Difference in Climate Change

There are two ways to reduce the environmental damage done by fossil fuels. The most common way is to reduce the use of fossil fuels — by driving a hybrid or electric car, for example, or using solar or wind power. The second way, carbon sequestration, involves pulling carbon out of the air and storing it in the ground.

NASA Langley Scientist Touts Biochar: An 'Environmental Superstar'

Over many centuries, primitive peoples plowed biochar into farm fields, turning poor soil into rich cropland. Now, it could help reverse global warming. That’s because an added benefit of carbon-packed biochar is that, by plowing it into farm fields, it removes the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide indefinitely from the carbon cycle.