Corporations Need Nature’s Regenerative Service

Many people do not perceive the value of wilderness areas, even though we receive life-sustaining services from them every day. These services include natural cycles that we take for granted such as climate regulation, water purification and maintaining biodiversity.

Kuli Kuli: A Superstar of Superfoods

Kuli Kuli partners with three co-manufacturers and over 1,000 farmers across more than 40 farms. It employs nine fulltime staff members in Oakland and a large part-time field team, including more than 20 people who are in charge of product demonstrations and 30 or so sales representatives.

Mexico’s Prickly Pear Cactus: Energy Source of the Future?

The prickly pear cactus is such a powerful symbol in Mexico that they put it smack in the middle of the national flag. It was considered sacred by the ancient Aztecs, and modern-day Mexicans eat it, drink it, and even use it in medicines and shampoos. Now scientists have come up with a new use for the bright green plant: producing renewable energy.

Mexico's Prickly Pear Cactus: Energy Source of the Future?

The prickly pear cactus is such a powerful symbol in Mexico that they put it smack in the middle of the national flag. It was considered sacred by the ancient Aztecs, and modern-day Mexicans eat it, drink it, and even use it in medicines and shampoos. Now scientists have come up with a new use for the bright green plant: producing renewable energy.

How You Can Help Fix the Global Water Crisis

Sandra Postel, director of the Global Water Policy Project and former National Geographic Society Freshwater Fellow, demystifies humanity’s obsession with water in her new book Replenish. When National Geographic caught up with her in New Mexico, she explained how people are coming up with innovative ways to conserve water before we run dry.

Changing Consumers Ignite Food Revolution

Much of the food industry has rallied around the idea of “sustainability,” which in the most precise definition refers to the ability of a food system to last over time. With sales of the packaged food staples that dominate American grocery aisles stagnant or sinking, the food industry has no choice but to adapt. Many of the changes start with how individual farmers treat the earth itself.